BOOK LAUNCH: Acoustic Jurisprudence: Listening to the Trial of Simon Bikindi by James E K Parker

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Join IILAH and Liquid Architecture in a belated celebration of the release of
Acoustic Jurisprudence: Listening to the Trial of Simon Bikindi
By James E K Parker
Launched in conversation with James by Professor Sundhya Pahuja and Joel Stern
with 30% discount available

Thursday 13 July 2017
5.00 – 6.30pm
Common Room, Melbourne Law School, 185 Pelham Street 3010 Victoria

Acoustic Jurisprudence explores the trial of Simon Bikindi, who was accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda of inciting genocide with his songs. The book develops two main threads: one substantive, the other methodoligical. Substantively, it is the first detailed study of a trial of considerable legal, historical and musicological importance, both to Rwandans and to the wider international community. Methodologically, the book examines a dimension of legal thought and practice that is scarcely ever remarked upon. Sound is a condition of the administration of justice, and yet as a community of jurists we have become deaf to law and to the problem of the acoustic. The book argues therefore for a specifically acoustic jurisprudence, an orientation towards law and the practice of judgment attuned to questions of sound and listening.

Dr James Parker is a senior lecturer at Melbourne Law School, where he is also director of the research program ‘Law, Sound and the International’ at the Institute for International Law and the Humanities.

CFP: 2017 African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific Annual Conference

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The 40th AFSAAP Annual Conference
“Researching Africa in Australasia – The Way Forward!”
23-24 November 2017
South Australia
University of South Australia and Monarto Zoo

The African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) is a network of academics, students, consultants, activists, diplomats, artists, community leaders, and others who share a mutual interest in the promotion of African Studies in Australasia and the Pacific region. AFSAAP was founded in 1978 and this will be the association’s 40th Annual Conference.

This conference aims to examine the future of African Studies in Australia and New Zealand, and discuss the possible ways forward. The direction of this discussion will be led by your research proposals showcasing African Studies in Australasia.

This THIRD and FINAL call asks you to submit your 200 word paper abstracts or proposals for a panel discussion by July 28th 2017 – email to afsaap2017@afsaap.org.au

Laws and Political Economies of the South

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Laws and Political Economies of the South

Thursday 23 February 2017
Room 609, Level 6, Melbourne Law School

ILAH is excited to announce an early career workshop with three field-changing scholars of international law, Professors Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah (NUS), Antony Anghie (NUS, Utah) and Donatella Alessandrini (Kent). This intimate workshop is an opportunity for early career scholars to develop work in progress that engages with relationships between international laws and political economies, and specifically with patterns of legal and economic arrangement that perpetuate contemporary global inequality.
We invite PhD candidates and Early Career Researchers working in international law, history, economics, postcolonial studies, and related fields to apply. Our three guest professors will read and comment on the work of up to 7 presenting participants. Up to 10 non-presenting participants who wish to participate in the discussion will also be accepted for attendance. The workshop will be preceded on Wednesday 22 February with an evening event, ‘Originating a Field – The Law of Foreign Investment: In Conversation with Professor Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah’.
How To Apply – Presenting Participants
Applications are due by February 3 2017.
In their one page application letter, Presenting Participants should include:
your research interests;
the project on which you would like our guests to comment;
why you would like to participate in this workshop;
whether you would like to attend as a non-presenting participant in the alternative;
If appropriate, applicants may also attach a short CV (max 2 pages) that details current academic and employment status and lists any publications, however this is not compulsory.
On acceptance, presenting participants will then be asked to submit up to 3,000 words of writing by Friday 17 February. The writing submission could be part of a thesis chapter, article, book proposal, grant application or other piece that addresses the workshop theme.
How To Apply – Non-Presenting Participants
If you are interested in attending as a Non-Presenting Participant, please submit one paragraph explaining your research interests, current status, and why the workshop is of interest to you.
Applications are due by Friday 10 February 2017
If you have any questions, please address them to Professor Sundhya Pahuja.

Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah is CJ Koh Professor at the Faculty of Law of the National University of Singapore. He is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Human Rights, London School of Economics, and has previously served as the Tunku Abdul Rahman Professor of International Law at the University of Malaya at Kuala Lumpur, and the Head of the Law School of the University of Tasmania, Australia. His extensive body of publications includes The Pursuit of Nationalized Property (Martinus Nijhoff, 1986); International Commercial Arbitration (Longman, 1992); The Law of International Joint Ventures (Longman, 1994); The International Law on Foreign Investment (Cambridge University Press, 1996, with a fourth edition in 2015); The Settlement of Foreign Investment Disputes (Kluwer, 2001) and Resistance and Change in the International Law on Foreign Investment (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Professor Sornarajah was the Director of the UNCTAD/WTO Programme on Investment Treaties, Pretoria and New Delhi. He is a member of the Advisory Boards of the International and Comparative Law Quarterly, the Indian Journal of International Law and several other international journals. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Columbia Centre Sustainable Investment. He is a Fellow of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration.

Antony Anghie is Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore. Professor Anghie is the author of Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2005) and a leading figure in the Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) movement.

Donatella Alessandrini is Co-Director of Postgraduate Studies at Kent Law School. Her publications include Developing Countries and the Multilateral Trade Regime: The Failure and Promise of the WTO’s Development Mission (Hart, 2010) and Value Making in International Economic Law and Regulation (Routledge, 2016). Dr Alessandrini’s research lies at the intersection of law and political economy, with a particular interest in development studies, critical trade and development literature, feminist political economy and political theory. Her earlier work has focused on the political economy of ‘development’ in multilateral trading relations, with an emphasis on the World Trade Organisation. Dr Alessandrini has served on the Editorial Boards of Feminist Legal Studies and Law and Critique, and is a member of the International Association of Feminist Economics and the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.

Originating a Field – The Law of Foreign Investment: In Conversation With Professor M. Sornarajah

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Originating a Field – The Law of Foreign Investment: In Conversation With Professor M. Sornarajah

Wednesday 22 February 2017
5pm to 6.30pm
Room 609, Level 6, Melbourne Law School

In this evening event, Professors Antony Anghie (National University of Singapore, Samuel D. Thurman Professor of Law at the University of Utah, and author of Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law) and Sundhya Pahuja (Director of IILAH, author of Decolonising International Law:Development, Growth and the Politics of Universality) will engage in a conversation with Professor Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah. At a time when international uncertainty is particularly acute, Professor Sornarajah will be invited to reflect upon his exceptional career in international law, his commitment to addressing global inequality, his origination of the field of the international law of foreign investment, and to his critical engagement with the enduring Eurocentricity of international law.
Muthucumaraswamy Sornarajah is CJ Koh Professor at the Faculty of Law of the National University of Singapore. He is Visiting Professor at the Centre for Human Rights, London School of Economics, and has previously served as the Tunku Abdul Rahman Professor of International Law at the University of Malaya at Kuala Lumpur, and the Head of the Law School of the University of Tasmania, Australia. His extensive body of publications includes The Pursuit of Nationalized Property (Martinus Nijhoff, 1986); International Commercial Arbitration (Longman, 1992); The Law of International Joint Ventures (Longman, 1994); The International Law on Foreign Investment (Cambridge University Press, 1996, with a fourth edition in 2015); The Settlement of Foreign Investment Disputes (Kluwer, 2001) and Resistance and Change in the International Law on Foreign Investment (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Professor Sornarajah was the Director of the UNCTAD/WTO Programme on Investment Treaties, Pretoria and New Delhi. He is a member of the Advisory Boards of the International and Comparative Law Quarterly, the Indian Journal of International Law and several other international journals. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Columbia Centre Sustainable Investment. He is a Fellow of the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration.
Antony Anghie is Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore. Professor Anghie is the author of Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2005) and a leading figure in the Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) movement.
Sundhya Pahuja is Director of the Institute of International Law and the Humanities at Melbourne Law School. Professor Pahuja’s book, Decolonising International Law: Development, Growth and the Politics of Universality won the American Society of International Law prize in 2012, and the Woodward Medal in the Humanities and Social Sciences in 2014. She is on the Advisory Board of the Critical Development Studies Network.

Geography Counts: Institute of Australian Geographers Conference

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Geography Counts: Institute of Australian Geographers Conference

11-14 July 2017, University of Queensland, Brisbane

This year’s conference theme is ‘Geography Counts’, stressing the role of geography in informing policy from a holistic, global perspective. Organisers also would like to stress the breadth of the discipline, and welcome participation across all sub-disciplines, and from those using a diversity of methodologies. The committee also welcomes your input on anything they can do to make the conference better, and to encourage alternative disciplinary perspectives wherever we can. The diversity of keynote speakers (to be announced shortly) reflects this, and they hope that both geographers and non-geographers from Australasia and beyond attend and contribute.

Catastrophe: Critical Legal Conference

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Catastrophe: Critical Legal Conference 2017 Call for Streams

Ten years ago, the so-called ‘Invisible Committee’ urged that ‘It is useless to wait…. To go on waiting is madness. The catastrophe is not coming, it is here. We are already situated within the collapse of a civilization. It is within this reality that we must choose sides.’ Over a decade before, Leonard Cohen had written; ‘This is the darkness, this is the flood. The catastrophe has already happpened and the question we now face is what is the appropriate behaviour.’ The 2017 Critical Legal Conference thus calls for streams, panels and papers that reflect upon ‘catastrophe’; on the catastrophes of our time and upon their interrelations; upon the questions of appropriate behaviours that might emerge and sides that might be taken. In particular we hope to encourage streams on:

Increasing brutality and violence of the carceral and security state;
War, migration, and refugee crises;
Racism, xenophobia, misogyny, transphobia, homophobia and countless forms of day to day violence;
On the atmospheres of violence under regimes of Modi, Temer, Trump, Brexit or Erdogan
Natural disasters and the effects of climate change in the anthropocene;
Forms of colonialism, neocolonialism and economic imperialism driven by capitalism and neoliberal ideologies;
Crises of care and depletion of the social reproductive capacities under global capitalism;
Rampant fear-mongering and the political exploitation of deprivation.
Catastrophe, disaster and crisis as modes of biopolitics, governance or accumulation
However, these catastrophes are only the most obvious effecting us today. Catastrophe does not necessarily imply a sudden fright or a grand world-historical moment that is evident to all. We also want to emphasise: the slow violence of catastrophe; the gradual and often imperceptible disintegration that is neither spectacular nor instantaneous; the ‘human catastrophes’ fostered by capitalism in its crises of social reproduction; intimate catastrophes, moments of collapse and calamity that concern the subject and the psyche, as well as the domestic.

Taking a cue from Bonnie Honig, we might identify the genre of this mode of critique as containing something of the dark romantics. The catastrophe is that chasmatic void into which we are about to fall (or perhaps we have already fallen). We are pervaded by a sense of the coming (or already arrived) doom. But despite this, catastrophe also suggests an opening to something beyond. It creates new spaces for resistance and solidarity, while potentially strengthening old ones. Catastrophe names the end in ancient Greek music and theatre, an unravelling and return to context. It was coupled with anakrousis – a sonorous explosion that was played at the beginning of a performance to clear the ears and so make space for a cosmos to be created. Catastrophe announced the overturning of that world and prepared the listeners to leave the theatre, to return to the street and to the context of popular life. Tolkien coins the term Eucatastrophe to signify the sudden positive resolution of a seemingly impossible situation. Thus, continuing from the hugely successful 2016 CLC focus on ‘turning points’, the theme of catastrophe asks us to consider the day after the moment of rupture, the period after the turning point.

What are the traps of thinking through ‘catastrophe’? Does catastrophe require redemption? Certainly modes of Christian theology imagine the katechon – the worldly suspension of the end times in which we are situated – as the holding-off of the justice of the end of the world. But by thinking our situation in other cosmologies, does the question of the catastrophe disappear, or appear differently? Or in a more profane sense, what are the problems of thinking through the lens of the catastrophe – is there a catastrophe (for us) in thinking catastrophe? Should we move away from the thought of the catastrophe and think more hopefully or joyfully?

Finally, we hope the question of catastrophe also invites a certain critical self-reflection. In liberal accounts, law seems to stand out against the catastrophe: the catastrophe is the perversion of legal rationality or the inability of pure legal norms to reach their proper context. Critical fields seek to undermine this claim, but to what extent and what effect? And what of the left’s own catastrophes, what of the co-option of resistance in human rights or development, or of the various collapses or exhaustions of left political and legal projects?

So we invite participants to the coming Catastrophe of the 2017 Critical Legal Conference at the Warwick Law School and in conjunction with the Social Theory Centre. It will take place on the 1st-3rd of September. Further details can be found on the conference webpage (Link). Please send your stream proposals to clcwarwick@gmail.com. The closing date for streams will be the 28th of February, the call for papers will open after that.

Oceanic Knowledges Conference

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Oceanic Knowledges Conference

Venue
Lecture Theatre 1, Hedley Bull Centre (130), corner of Garran Road and Liversidge Street, ANU
Date
Friday, 27 January, 2017 – 08:30 to Saturday, 28 January, 2017 – 17:00
ANU Humanities Research Centre in association with the Centre for Collective Biography of Archaeology in the Pacific and ANU Pacific Institute.

Oceanic Knowledges
Friday 27 January – Saturday 28 January

Hedley Bull Lecture Theatre 1,
Hedley Bull Centre #130
Crn Liversidge St and Garran Rd,
Australian National University

The ANU Humanities Research Centre, in partnership with the Centre for Collective Biography of Archaeology in the Pacific and ANU Pacific Institute, is holding a conference on 27-28 January 2017 on knowledge and culture in Oceania.

Presentations will explore aspects of the constitution, conservation and transmission of knowledge, and the way people of Oceania imagine and experience culture, both in its material and intangible forms. Through the presence of a number of leading practitioners working in cultural institutions, the conference will also discuss the challenges and opportunities presented by new media.

Conference speakers
Speakers will include:

Opeta Alefaio (National Archives of Fiji)
Lazare Asal (Vanuatu Cultural Centre)
Bronwen Douglas (ARC Laureate Project, ANU)
Katherine Daniell (Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU)
Ceridwen Fraser (Fenner School of Environment and Society, ANU)
Michael Gunn (ex-Pacific Art, National Gallery of Australia)
Tony Heorake (Solomon Islands National Museum)
Weniko Ihage (Academy of Kanak Languages, New Caledonia)
Frances Koya Vaka’uta (University of the South Pacific, Fiji)
Michael Mel (West Pacific Collection, Australian Museum)
Andrew Moutu (PNG National Museum)
Mara Mulrooney (Bishop Museum, Hawai’i)
Jenny Newell (East Pacific Collection, Australian Museum)
Mere Ratunabuabua (Fiji Museum)
Larry Raigetal (Waa’gey Organization, Yap)
Emmanuel Tjibaou (Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Noumea)
Kolokesa Tuai (Auckland War Memorial Museum).
Registration
Please register for this conference at Eventbrite:

oceanic-knowledges.eventbrite.com.au

Registration is free.

Conference programs
Download the conference program:

Oceanic Knowledges conference program (1.5 Meg PDF)

Download the general conference flyer:

Oceanic Knowledges flyer (1.5 Meg PDF)

Contact
For further details, please contact Peter Brown:

Peter.Brown@anu.edu.au

Pacific Research Colloquium
The conference will be followed by the Pacific Research Colloquium, featuring early career Pacific scholars, beginning 30 January at the ANU.

Launch of World Development Report 2017

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Launch of World Development Report 2017
The World Development Report 2017 on Governance and the Law explores how policies for security, growth and equity can effectively achieve their goals by addressing the underlying drivers of governance.

Building on the traditional concern about implementation problems resulting from limited state capacity, this report digs deeper to understand also how individuals and groups, with differing degrees of influence in the decision-making arena, bargain over the choice of policies, distribution of resources, and how to change the rules themselves to shape future interactions.

While in some cases, power asymmetries can lead to persistent policy failure through exclusion, capture, and clientelism, this report demonstrates that positive change is possible. The approach discusses reshaping incentives, shifting society’s preferences and beliefs, and making the decision-making process more contestable.

Join us the day before the Australasian Aid Conference for the launch of the The World Development Report 2017, including a presentation of the report and a panel discussion.

For more information about the 2017 AAC and to register: Devpolicy.crawford.anu.edu.au/annual-australasian-aid-conference/2017

2017 Australasian Aid Conference

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2017 Australasian Aid Conference
The Australasian Aid Conference will return on 15-16 February 2017, once again in partnership with The Asia Foundation. As in previous years, the aim of the 2017 Australasian Aid Conference is to bring together researchers from across Australia, the Pacific, Asia and beyond who are working on aid and international development policy to share insights, promote collaboration, and help develop the research community. With 500 people registering in 2016, the AAC has established itself as Australia’s premier aid and development conference.

The 2017 AAC will be held at Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU, Canberra on February 15 and 16, 2017. The conference convenors are Professor Stephen Howes, Director of the Development Policy Centre at ANU; Dr Joel Negin, Head of School and Associate Professor of International Public Health at the University of Sydney School of Public Health; Anthea Mulakala, Director for International Development Cooperation at The Asia Foundation; and Camilla Burkot, Research Officer at the Development Policy Centre.

Conference program
Details about the conference program, including invited speakers and a downloadable conference program, can be found here.

Call for papers
The call for papers for the 2017 Australasian Aid Conference (AAC) is now closed.

If you have any questions relating to the call for papers or any other aspect of the conference, please contact devpolicy@anu.edu.au with “2017 Australasian Aid Conference” in the subject line.

Side events
On 14 February, the World Development Report 2017: Governance and the Law will be launched. The launch will feature a presentation of the report by Luis Felipe Lopez Calva, co-Director of the WDR, followed by a panel discussion with representatives from DFAT, Oxfam Australia, and ANU. Further information and registration can be found here.

The WDR launch will be followed by a cocktail reception and launch of a new book entitled India’s Approach to Development Cooperation, co-edited by Anthea Mulakala and Sachin Chaturvedi. All conference speakers and registered participants are warmly invited to attend.

The Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade’s inaugural Aid Supplier Conference will be held at the Crawford School on 17 February (the day after the Australasian Aid Conference concludes). DFAT’s conference will focus on issues associated with procuring and implementing effective aid activities, and will include opportunities to discuss current and future procurement plans. Further information can be obtained from aidsupplierconference@dfat.gov.au.

Conference hosts
The Development Policy Centre

The Development Policy Centre (Devpolicy) is a think tank for aid and development serving Australia, the region, and the global development community. Devpolicy undertakes independent research and promotes practical initiatives to improve the effectiveness of Australian aid, to support the development of Papua New Guinea and the Pacific island region, and to contribute to better global development policy.

Devpolicy was established in September 2010 and is based at Crawford School of Public Policy in the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University.

The Asia Foundation

The Asia Foundation is a non-profit international development organization committed to improving lives across a dynamic and developing Asia. Informed by six decades of experience and deep local expertise, our programs address critical issues affecting Asia in the 21st century—governance and law, economic development, women’s empowerment, environment, and regional cooperation. In addition, our Books for Asia and professional exchange programs are among the ways we encourage Asia’s continued development as a peaceful, just, and thriving region of the world.

Headquartered in San Francisco, The Asia Foundation works through a network of offices in 18 Asian countries and in Washington, DC. Working with public and private partners, the Foundation receives funding from a diverse group of bilateral and multilateral development agencies, foundations, corporations, and individuals. In 2012, we provided nearly $100 million in direct program support and distributed textbooks and other educational materials valued at over $30 million. Our development policy work brings together traditional and emerging Asian providers to share their perspectives and ideas about the changing dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region and international development cooperation.

Program and speakers
At the 2017 AAC we will be presenting plenary sessions on rethinking governance, the crisis in humanitarian aid, Asian approaches to engaging the private sector in development cooperation, and ideas for improving Australian aid. Additional program and speaker details will be added here as they become available – please check back.

Postcolonial Mediations: Globalisation and Displacement

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Postcolonial Mediations: Globalisation and Displacement
12 September 2016
Fourth Annual ACGS Conference
Amsterdam, 26-27 October 2017

Keynote speakers:
Victoria Bernal (Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine, US)
Paula Chakravartty (Associate Professor Media, Culture and Communication, New York University, New York, US)
Iain Chambers (Professor of Cultural and Postcolonial Studies, Oriental University, Naples, Italy)
Postcolonial thinking has challenged the stability of discourses on culture, globalisation, economics, human rights and politics. Postcolonial thinking, as a form of mediation and displacement of worldviews, triggered a re-evaluation of the complex connections between culture, class, economy, gender and sexuality. This conference aims to engage with such postcolonial displacements.

Displacement can be seen under the rubric of mobility and its many forms today, most tellingly discernible in the forced movements of peoples in the wake of wars, and the concomitant crises this provokes around issues of “culture and civilization”, and its gendered, religious and raced dimensions. The refugee crisis in Europe is an important case in point. Cultural productions from the non-West continue to displace received understandings of other cultures and societies (Chow, 2002, Narayan, 1997) while contemporary political movements draw inspiration from postcolonial struggles as they deploy new media forms, as Howard Caygill (2013) has recently shown in his analyses of the Gandhian non-violence movement, the continuing Maoist rebellions and their relation to the Zapatistas and the Indignados. The shifting contours of gender and sexual politics, and the critique of stable identities provoked by queer politics and theory, are also producing displacements, in the discourse and practice of the politics of rights. Local, regional and national politics often challenge universal rights claims. e.g. the controversies around the relevance of “Global Queer” (Altman, 1996).

The postcolonial is understood here simultaneously as a mediating and a displacing series of interventions, which demands engagement with contemporary understandings of globalisation.

We invite papers that explore the complexity of postcolonial mediations in their interaction with the displacements of globalisation through theoretical and empirical analyses.

Possible topics include:

1. How can a postcolonial perspective inform newer understandings of contemporary forms of cultural, political and economic globalisation? For example, what does the “neo-colonial” turn (Mignolo) imply for thinking globalisation’s many dimensions today? What purchase might postcolonial perspectives (including postcolonial self-critique) have in the context of “planetary” (Spivak) developments, discussions of “Empire” and “Multitude” (Hardt/Negri) and articulations of “singular” (Jameson) and alternative modernities?

2. Migration in its many forms has centralized displacement as a crucial feature of globalisation. How might a postcolonial perspective further a contemporary engagement with the displacements of peoples in the wake of economic globalisation, political crises, human rights crises, and the ongoing militarization of the globe? How can the figures of the “migrant”, the “refugee” and the “asylum-seeker”, for example, be rethought given their contemporary reformulations by nation-states and transnational entities such as the EU and other multilateral deportation/resettling schemes in Asia?

3. Queer theory has long argued that gender and sexuality are not external dimensions to be “added” onto considerations of subjectivity but intrinsic to how “human” subjectivities are lived, transformed and theorized. How do contemporary forms of displacement register at the level of gender and sexual politics? And how might queer forms of thinking intervene, mediate, displace or consolidate racist, sexist, transphobic, and hetero-normative discourses in the wake of globalisation, often under the rubric of culture and civilization?

4. Contemporary forms of globalisation are not only represented but also actively constructed through forms of media engagement, from political mobilization through social media to filmic and televisual cultural practices. These mediated forms of global politics demand different forms of analysis while also provoking transformations in how we theorize media themselves. How can “mediation” be confronted and theorized given the postcolonial dimensions of contemporary globalisation?

5. The contours of globalisation in terms of borders, the nation-states and transnational communities are being displaced and redrawn in the content of contemporary economic, political and military crises. How might postcolonial perspectives furnish cognitive and affective mappings of the overlaps and disjunctions of political and cultural cartographies?

6. Given that a “postcolonial perspective” unites competing perspectives (e.g. the literary, the politico-economic, the Marxist, the postmodernist) rather than a unified and homogenous body of arguments, what are the contemporary forms of internal displacement within the field?

Contributions from fields from across the social sciences or humanities are invited.

Please submit an abstract (200-300 words) and short bio (max. 100 words) by 1 February 2017 to acgs-fgw@uva.nl. Notice of acceptance will be given by 1 May 2017. Conference fee: 50 Euros (25 Euros for PhD students). Conference dinner: 25 Euros.

Organisers: Sudeep Dasgupta (University of Amsterdam), John Nguyet Erni (Hong Kong Baptist University), Aniko Imre (University of Southern California), Jeroen de Kloet (University of Amsterdam), Sandra Ponzanesi (Utrecht University), Raka Shome (National University of Singapore)